Christine Young

I am a writer and avid reader of romances particularly historical romances. Please join me on my journey through time

Gladiatorial shows ~ Venatio ~ the animal hunt

A beautiful day marked our visit to the colosseum as well as long lines but not as much wait time as Vatican City. The sun was warm but the shade proved to be cool so it was jacket on jacket off.

The building was made from concrete and sand. It is the largest amphitheater ever built. Construction began in AD 72 and finished in AD 80. The structure could hold between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators. It was used for Gladiatorial contests, animal hunts, mock sea battles and drama based on mythology.

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The colosseum was built by Jewish slaves who refused to succumb to the Roman Empire and adopt its religion. The construction was funded by spoils taken from the jewish Temple in 70 AD. In 217 it was badly damaged by a major fire caused by lightening because the upper part was wooden.

Gladiatorial fights were first mentioned around 435. A major earthquake caused damage in 443. The arena continued to be used for contests well into the 6th century. The great earthquake of 1349 caused the outer south side to collapse.

 

 

In recent time since 2000 the Colosseum has become a symbol of the campaign against capital punishment. Whenever a person anywhere in the world gets their death sentence commuted the night time illumination changes from white to gold. In 2012 the colosseum was illuminated in gold following the abolishment of capital punishment in Connecticut.

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This entry was posted on October 14, 2016 by in Uncategorized.

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